Lit. 370-01 (1449) & -02 (2033):  Justice and Revenge in Ancient Literature             Prof. Pat Licklider, Fall 2011

Always bring your text to class.  The assignments listed next to each date must be read by that date.

Aug. 30:  Introduction to the course; Aristotle on anger and revenge

Sept. 1: Read Chap. 1 of  Popular Ethics in Ancient Greece by Lionel Pearson on Ereserve.  The password is revenge.  Buy the Iliad.  Be prepared to write about some of the moral issues that Pearson describes in 5th century Greece.

Sept. 6:  Read the Iliad, Books 1, 2, 3, and 4

Sept. 8:  Read the Iliad, Books 6 and 9.  Also read "Duelling with Gifts in the Iliad" by Walter Donlon on Ereserve.  The password is revenge.  Be prepared to write on how Donlon helps you understand Achilles' remarks in Book 9.  Use my Study Aids for what happens in the chapters of the poem that we are skipping.

Sept. 13: Read the Iliad, Books 16, 18 and 19. Again, use my Study Aids for the chapters we are skipping.

Sept. 15:  Read the Iliad, Books 20 and 21.

Sept. 20:  Read the Iliad, Books 22, 23, and 24.

Sept. 22:  Read the Odyssey, Books 1 and 9.  Also read Chapter 2 of Helping Friends and Harming Enemies by Mary Blundell on Ereserve. The password is revenge.  Be prepared to discuss what the ancient Greeks meant by "philoi."  

Sept. 27:  Read the Odyssey, Books 17, 18, and 19.

Sept. 29 & Oct. 4:  No Classes

Oct. 6:  Read the Odyssey, Books 21-24.  Be prepared to write about the ways in which Homer justifies the slaughter of the suitors.  In class, divide among your group members the reading of pp. vi-xliii of the introduction by Helene Foley to Aeschylus' Oresteia.  

Oct. 11:  Groups report on the Foley reading and then work on their Homer presentations.

Oct. 13:  Group Presentations of Homeric Passages 

Oct. 18:  Read the first play of Aeschylus' OresteiaAgamemnon, pp. 3-66.  Use my Study Aids for help.  

Oct. 20:  Read the second play in the Oresteia, The Libation-Bearers, pp. 69-113.  Use my Study Aids for help.  

Oct. 25:  Read the third play in the Oresteia, The Furies, pp. 117-160.  Use my Study Aids for help.   

Oct. 27:  Read Chap. 4 of Popular Ethics in Ancient Greece by Pearson on Ereserve.  The password is revenge.  

Nov. 1:  Read Euripides' play Medea in Medea and Other Plays, translated by Vellacott.   

Nov. 3:  Read Euripides' play Hekabe in Medea and Other Plays, translated by Vellacott.    Also divide among your group members and start reading the selection from The Fragility of Goodness by Martha Nussbaum on Ereserve.  The password is revenge.  You will share your info with the group in the next class.

Nov. 8:  Finish reading the selection from Nussbaum's Fragility of Goodness.  In class, divide among your group the readings from Robert Alter's The Art of Biblical Narrative on Ereserve, Chapter 3, 4, 6, and part of 5.  The password is revenge.  You will share your info with the group in the next class.

Nov. 10:  Read 1 Samuel 8-18 in The David Story, translated by Robert Alter.  Use my Study Aids for help.

Nov. 15:  Read 1 Samuel 19-28  in The David Story, translated by Robert Alter. Use my Study Aids for help. 

Nov. 17:  Read 1 Samuel 29-31 and 2 Samuel 1-6 in The David Story, translated by Robert Alter. Use my Study Aids

Nov. 22:  Read 2 Samuel 9-16 in The David Story, translated by Robert Alter. Use my Study Aids for help. 

Nov. 24:  No Classes  Happy Thanksgiving!

Nov. 29:  Read 2 Samuel 17-20 and 1 Kings 1-2 in The David Story, translated by Robert Alter.  In class, divide among your group the article by Hans Jensen, "Desire, Rivalry, and Collective Violence in the 'Succession Narrative'" on Ereserve.  The password is revenge.  You will share your info with the group in the next class.

Dec. 1:  Read your section of Jensen's "Desire, Rivalry, and Collective Violence in the 'Succession Narrative'." 

Dec. 6:  Modern examples of the conflict between justice and revenge.  Also, groups work on their trials.

Dec. 8:  Modern examples, continued.  Also, groups work on their trials.

Dec. 13:  Similarities and Differences between ancient and modern notions of justice.  Also, groups work on their trials.

Dec. 20 or 22:  Groups present trials during their section's final exam period.